Letter writing campaign pays off, for us and science

Reflecting on our experiences writing letters to editors and authors to try to improve the literature through post-publication peer review, we were invited to write a comment in Nature, which we titled “Reproducibility: A tragedy of errors”.

Over the course of at least 18 months, we wrote numerous letters to editors and authors, including direct contacts, contacts through submission systems, and PubMed Commons. The effort took much time and was often frustratingly slow, including sometimes ending without a resolution. Continue reading

Several new letters trying to correct the literature

Over the last some-odd months we have published letters and online comments to try to clarify and correct the literature where we saw plagiarism, potentially invalidating analyses, and overstatements of results. See some below:

Errors in statistical analysis and questionable randomization lead to unreliable conclusions.

Comment on “Intervention effects of a school-based health promotion programme on obesity related behavioural outcomes.”

Comment on “School-Based Obesity Prevention Intervention in Chilean Children: Effective in Controlling, but not Reducing Obesity.”

Concerning Sichieri R, Cunha DB: Obes Facts 2014;7:221-232. The Assertion that Controlling for Baseline (Pre-Randomization) Covariates in Randomized Controlled Trials Leads to Bias Is False.

Letter to the Editor: Exceptional Data in Paper on “The effect of meridian massage on BM, BMI, WC and HC in simple obesity patients: a randomized controlled trial.”

New partnership with the Global Energy Balance Network to focus on recent research

UPDATE 2015-12-18. GEBN has stopped operations. I hope to get permission to post our article reviews elsewhere so they can continue to contribute to the conversation.

 

A group of us in the Office of Energetics at the University of Alabama at Birmingham are pairing with the Global Energy Balance Network to foster conversations on the science of energy balance.

Our goal will be to represent the highlights of recent science, presented through a scientific lens that we hope will avoid the overselling of research that is all-too-common in research communication today. In each article, we will present the results of the research in context, provide an overview of the scientific methodology employed, and explain why we found the study to be particularly interesting, paradigm shifting, creative, or otherwise noteworthy.

Led by Dr. David Allison and myself, the group of investigators will include Dr. Kathryn A Kaiser, Dr. Greg Pavela, and Dr. Brandon George. We also hope to invite others to coauthor these articles with us. Visit GEBN and join the conversation!

Awarded the Science Unbound Foundation Best Paper Award

Our paper, “Belief beyond the evidence: using the proposed effect of breakfast on obesity to show 2 practices that distort scientific evidence,” received the 2014 Best Paper Award from the Science Unbound Foundation for a paper by a University of Alabama at Birmingham investigator in the area of nutrition and obesity. The Science Unbound Foundation has as its mission:

“Furthering scientific knowledge in the service of health, happiness, and quality of life of humankind through scientific research and education.”

Thank you to the foundation for recognizing our work.

Promoted to Scientist

On June 1st of 2014 I was promoted from Postdoctoral Trainee to Scientist within the Office of Energetics at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. I am excited to continue developing my research program with my colleagues at UAB and appreciate the flexibility I am being afforded by the Office of Energetics as my wife, who is an Assistant Professor at Clemson, and I continue to figure out the two body problem (or, as Dr. David Allison once put it, the two body advantage!).

First place: Postdoc Research Day Oral Competition

The Postdotoral Association and the Office of Postdoctoral Education at the University of Alabama at Birmingham held PostDoc Research Day 2014 with oral presentation competitions. I was awarded first place for my presentation entitled, “Using crowdsourcing to evaluate published scientific literature: Methods and example.” Every presentation in the session was well delivered and quite interesting, which made being selected first place truly an honor next to the other fantastic presentations.